Democrats are anti-science on the issue of sex

Ashley McGuire:
Feminists in the 1960s and 70s argued that men and women are not inherently different. The many apparent differences between the sexes — beyond the undeniable anatomical ones — are simply the result of gender roles people are taught to fulfill, not of their natures as men or women. This was the era when parents were told that their daughters would be just as happy playing with toy trucks as with dolls and that making the switch would help end sexism and liberate girls for a better future. Women sought to detach themselves from the aspects of womanhood they found limiting, especially their fertility.

For decades, gender theory gained steam, seeking the complete abolition of gender distinctions in any way tied to the two biological sexes.

In 1992, family therapist John Gray published Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus. The book's premise was simple: men and women are different, and understanding those differences, not living in denial of them, is the key to relationship success. The book's popularity exploded. It became not just a bestselling book of its decade, but one of the bestselling books of all time.
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Major advances in neurobiology, for example, unveiled just how differently men and women respond physically to intimacy. During intercourse, the female releases more oxytocin than the male. Oxytocin is the hormone that facilitates bonding between human beings, in particular between mothers and new babies and between heterosexual partners. It's colloquially referred to as "the love hormone," "the hug hormone," the "cuddle chemical," the "moral molecule," and the "bliss hormone," and is especially noted for the different roles it plays in female reproduction.

According to the American Psychological Association, "New studies are adding to a body of literature that shows oxytocin plays a key role in maternal bonding and social affiliation — what [social psychologist Shelley] Taylor has labeled the 'tend and befriend' response, as opposed to the 'fight or flight' response."

Oxytocin, researchers discovered, makes a woman more vulnerable and attached to the man with whom she is having sex. Men release a small amount of oxytocin during intercourse, too, but they release an even bigger amount of testosterone, which has the effect of suppressing the oxytocin.

So science has a basic explanation for why women will stare at their phone after casual sex, hoping their partner will contact them, while men do not. As one woman wrote in a piece for Elite Daily, "The Truth Behind Why Women Find It Harder to Have Casual Sex than Men Do," the phenomenon of oxytocin offers "a scientific explanation as to why after sex, women are left wondering if and when she will hear from a guy. All the while, guys are scrolling through Tinder on their couch, wondering if that chicken parm they ordered an hour ago is actually on its way." "Women," she writes, "are programmed to become emotionally attached" in a way that men are not.
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There is much more.

I think the left generally refuses to believe the science because it is inconsistent with their preferred narrative.  They prefer to invent new phobias than understanding the science about the differences.

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