Obama shows his wimpy side in Russian-Georgia war

Politico:

When the North Caucasus slid into war Thursday night, it presented John McCain and Barack Obama with a true “3 a.m. moment,” and their responses to the crisis suggested dramatic differences in how each candidate, as president, would lead America in moments of international crisis.

While Obama offered a response largely in line with statements issued by democratically elected world leaders, including President Bush, first calling on both sides to negotiate, John McCain took a remarkably — and uniquely — more aggressive stance, siding clearly with Georgia’s pro-Western leaders and placing the blame for the conflict entirely on Russia.

...

McCain’s statement was longer, more detailed and more confrontational.

"[T]he news reports indicate that Russian military forces crossed an internationally recognized border into the sovereign territory of Georgia. Russia should immediately and unconditionally cease its military operations and withdraw all forces from sovereign Georgian territory.

“The government of Georgia has called for a ceasefire and for a resumption of direct talks on South Ossetia with international mediators. The U.S. should immediately work with the EU and the OSCE to put diplomatic pressure on Russia to reverse this perilous course that it has chosen.”

John McCain’s top foreign policy adviser, Randy Scheunemann, defended McCain’s direct criticism of Russia in the early hours of the crisis.

"Sen. McCain is clearly willing to note who he thinks is the aggressor here,” he said, dismissing the notion that Georgia’s move into its renegade province had precipitated the crisis. "I don't think you can excuse, defend, explain or make allowance for Russian behavior because of what is going on in Georgia.”

He also criticized Obama for calling on both sides to show “restraint,” and suggested the Democrat was putting too much blame on the conflict’s clear victim.

“That's kind of like saying after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, that Kuwait and Iraq need to show restraint, or like saying in 1968 [when the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia] ... that the Czechoslovaks should show restraint,” he said.

...
There is a case to be made that Russia provoked the conflict to begin with. It has been interfering with Georgia's internal affairs to hep some ethnic dissidents resist the government. When the government moved to suppress that resistance the Russians made a bogus claim of ethnic cleansing and genocide.

One of the ways you can tell those claims were bogus is Putin resisted such charges against Saddam Hussein and the regime in Sudan when the evidence demonstrated massive genocide in the hundreds of thousands. His claims in this case are clearly in bad faith and McCain has the courage to call him on it and Obama goes with state departmentese.

I know Obama is following he same posture as the Bush administration. But isn't he the guy that says we need change?

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